Child immunisations & details consent

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/when-to-immunise/pregnancy-and-baby

This is a fantastic outline of child vaccinations advising of the vaccinations by age of vaccination.

Please see the bottom of the page regarding management of temperature due to the shortage of paracetamol due to coronavirus.

It gives details of each vaccination including an overview of why the vaccinations are necessary and information about the vaccinations, when and where to get it, things to note after teh vaccine as well as further information. These Green Book is a guide produced by the NHS which advises on vaccinations.

The vaccinations at childhhod age groups by the green book are displayed and then information on the vaccinations not yet had included.

Green book with details re vaccinations

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/855727/Greenbook_chapter_11_UK_Immunisation_schedule.pdf

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/the-6-in-1-vaccine#overview

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/meningitis-b-menb-vaccine

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/rotavirus-vaccine

 

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/pneumococcal-vaccine-for-babies

 

 

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/hibmenc-vaccine

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/mmr-vaccine

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/child-flu-vaccine

 

 

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/when-to-immunise/children-from-3-years-4-months

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/the-4-in-1-vaccine

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/immunisation/vaccines/mmr-vaccine

 

 

 

There is a shortage of liquid infant paracetamol which is often used by parents to help manage a baby’s reaction to their routine immunisations so won’t parents stop bringing their babies because of this?

Vaccination to protect from serious conditions should not be delayed. Whilst parents should continue to try to obtain and administer infant paracetamol if possible, infant vaccines can and should still be given even if it is not possible to give prophylactic paracetamol.

Where parents have been unable to obtain infant paracetamol, the following advice is for clinical staff in primary care and parents.

  • Fever can be expected after any vaccination but is more common when the MenB vaccine (Bexsero) is given with the other routine vaccines at eight and sixteen weeks of age.
  • In infants who do develop a fever after vaccination, the fever tends to peak around six hours after vaccination and is nearly always gone completely within two days.
  • Ibuprofen can alternatively be used to treat a fever and other post-vaccination reactions. Prophylactic ibuprofen at the time of vaccination is not effective. Ibuprofen is not licensed for infants under the age of 3 months or body-weight under 5 kg. However, the BNF for Children advises that ibuprofen can be used for post-immunisation pyrexia in infants aged 2 to 3 months, on doctor’s advice only, using 50 mg for 1 dose, followed by 50 mg after 6 hours if required. See the BNF for Children for more details https://bnfc.nice.org.uk/drug/ibuprofen.html#indicationsAndDoses
  • There have been concerns about the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, in relation to COVID-19. This is being investigated by the Commission on Human Medicines and NICE. NHS England have advised in the interim for patients who have confirmed COVID-19, or believe they have COVID-19, that they use paracetamol in preference to NSAIDs. If parents cannot obtain their own supply of infant paracetamol and it has not been possible to prescribe it, as their baby will have been assessed as being well before vaccination, providing their baby has fever only and no symptoms consistent with COVID-19 infection, consideration should be given to using ibuprofen as described above. https://www.cas.mhra.gov.uk/ViewandAcknowledgment/ViewAlert.aspx?AlertID=103001
  • Information about treating a fever in children is available from the NHS UK webpage “Fever in children” at www.nhs.uk/conditions/fever-in-children/
  • If an infant still has a fever 48 hours after vaccination or if parents are concerned about their infant’s health at any time, they should seek advice from their GP or NHS 111.
  • The diseases that the vaccines protect against are very serious and therefore vaccination should not be delayed because of concerns about post-vaccination fever.

How will parents know when their babies have a temperature after their regular immunisations whether it is an expected reaction or COVID-19?

Parents should be advised that the vaccines given may cause a fever which is usually resolved within 48 hours (or 6 to 11 days following MMR). This is a common expected reaction and isolation is not required, unless COVID-19 is suspected.

When the MenB vaccine (Bexsero) is given with other vaccines at 8 and 16 weeks of age, fever is more common. Where parents are able to obtain liquid infant paracetamol, they should follow existing PHE guidance on the use of prophylactic paracetamol following MenB vaccination available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/menb-vaccine-and-paracetamol

Indications to date suggest that COVID-19 causes mild or asymptomatic illness in infants and children. As has always been recommended, any infant with fever after vaccination should be monitored and if parents are concerned about their infant’s health at any time, they should seek advice from their GP or NHS 111. Post-immunisation fever alone is not a reason to self-isolate.

This advice applies to recently vaccinated people of all ages.

Any infant with fever after vaccination should be monitored and if parents are concerned about their infant’s health at any time, they should seek advice from their GP or NHS 111.

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